Laval, October 22nd, 2015 – Eighty-one percent of the UPS workers who voted were in favour of ratifying the tentative agreement negotiated between Teamsters Canada and company management on September 24.

Under the new employment contract, valid until February 2020, wages will increase by $4.15 per hour. The pension plan was also enhanced. In addition, UPS will now compensate workers when rules on excessive overtime are not respected. This was a recurring bone of contention between the parties.

Several non-monetary clauses concerning benefits and allocations were also improved. Furthermore, in the wake of the campaign launched by the Teamsters on September 17, a mental health assistance and awareness program is now enshrined in the new Collective Agreement.

“I would like to congratulate members of the Negotiating Committee for their excellent work throughout the talks,” said Teamsters Canada President, François Laporte. “They demonstrated creativity in order to improve working conditions for our members who, in turn, expressed their satisfaction by ratifying the Collective Agreement.”

“Our members made a wise decision given the current economic climate.”

Teamsters Canada represents around 7,000 workers at UPS.

Teamsters Canada represents 120 000 members in Canada in all industries. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:

Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Public Relations
Cell: 514-609-5101
Email: slacroix@teamsters.ca

Laval, September 3 2015 — The Teamsters have been eagerly awaiting the release of a report by Université Laval CREATE (Centre de recherche en économie de l’environnement, de l’agroalimentaire des transports et de l’énergie) on the performance of selective collection and bottle deposit fee systems.

The Teamsters Union represents thousands of workers at Sleeman, Labatt, and Molson whose livelihoods could be affected by the conclusion of this report.

The report proposes three options for the provincial government to consider for refillable containers (such capped brown beer bottles) and disposable single-use containers (such as beer cans):

  • Expand the deposit fee system to other containers
  • Transfer to selective collection
  • Increase the current deposit fee

Historically, the Teamsters have always favoured the private deposit system for capped brown beer bottles both for economic and environmental reasons.

From an economic standpoint, the jobs created by the filling and deposit return of capped brown beer bottles provide a decent living for thousands of Quebec families. Moreover, these workers pay taxes and income taxes that contribute to Quebec’s economic health. Close to 25,000 direct and indirect jobs are created by the breweries.

From an environmental standpoint, 98% of capped brown beer bottles are recovered and reused between 12 and 17 times before being crushed, melted and produced into new bottles. These bottles are considered the greenest containers.

On the other hand, beer cans all too often end up in landfills or recycling bins.

This is why the Teamsters Union recommends that the penalty brewers pay to Recyc-Québec when they sell more than 37% of their beer in single-use containers (such as cans) be maintained. The union also has no objection to the government’s raising the minimum price of cans in order to motivate consumers to opt for capped brown bottles.

“Many European countries have moved away from cans,” said Teamsters Local Union 1999 president Serge Bérubé, who represents thousands of workers employed by Quebec’s main breweries. “We don’t believe that the only way for breweries to boost their market share is by offering more of their beer in cans.”

These same European countries have adopted rules requiring the industry to almost exclusively use containers that can be recycled many times, such as capped brown beer bottles. On average, they account for 97% of the containers on the market. In addition to a green tax levied by Belgium, Finland and Norway, Denmark prohibits the sale of cans. Environmental legislation in these European counties is clearly stricter than in Quebec.

The Université Laval report also analyzes the pros and cons of expanding deposit to wine and spirits. For the Teamsters Union, having a deposit fee on all bottles is a viable solution.

The Quebec government has a golden opportunity to make up for lost time on this issue, particularly in relation to Alberta, by imposing a deposit on wine bottles. It can also gradually eliminate the presence of cans at landfills by encouraging consumers to purchase capped brown bottles.

The Teamsters represent thousands of workers at the Sleeman, Labatt and Molson breweries in Quebec.

The Teamsters represent 120 000 members in Canada in all industries. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:

Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Public Relations
Cell: 514 609-5101
Email: slacroix@teamsters.ca

Laval, February 4, 2013 – The Teamsters are already in talks with all the stakeholders in order to improve worker safety and training in the armored transport industry.

The robbery of G4S trucks in Longueuil and Toronto has highlighted the need for companies offering valued goods transportation to revisit certain operating procedures and decisions.

“We’re well aware of the psychological impact these robberies have on our 1,000 Canadian members who work in this industry,” said Teamsters Canada’s Communications Director, Stéphane Lacroix. “We’re also worried about the public’s safety.”

For this reason, the Teamsters have already started discussions with the Minister of Public Safety, Steven Blaney as well as armored transport firms. In fact, Teamsters Canada is the only union to sit down at the same table with both employers and the government.

“We appreciate the support of our fellow unions, but we don’t think that ranting and raving in public is going to further our cause,” added Lacroix. “We feel that negotiations are a better way to solve the problems.”

Lacroix goes on to say that “Having teams of two in the truck is just one of many issues we plan to resolve very shortly.”

Moreover, Garda’s acquisition of G4S doesn’t change anything for the 400 Québec workers represented by the Teamsters Union. The collective agreement negotiated by the parties remains in effect and the members will be informed of any changes.

The Teamsters represents 115,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:

Nathalie Mayer, Communications Department
Telephone: 450 682-5521
Email: nmayer@teamsters.ca

Facebook.com/TeamstersCanada ▪ Twitter.com/TeamstersCanada ▪ Teamsters.ca

Laval, December 4, 2012 – A dispatcher at Purolator Courier in Montreal and steward of Local Union 931, Érik Desjardins is the first recipient of the “Carol McGregor Canadian Labour Congress Disability Rights Award.” Announced on December 3, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, the prize recognizes the outstanding contributions of a worker with a disability who has made an impact in the union and/or the community by promoting and defending the rights of persons with disabilities.

The 32 year-old recipient is involved in the workplace, works with young people, plays sports and is active in his community. As a call centre employee with another union, he was willing to lose his seniority a few years ago to take up more challenges and to be involved with the Teamsters. In 2008, he was elected by his peers as shop steward.

He is an excellent leader and communicator; he raises disability awareness and fights for the rights of the disabled. He made sure his own workplace was adapted to his needs and recently had his company build ramps and create handicapped parking spaces.

“He doesn’t see his disability as an obstacle or limitation,” said Teamsters Canada President Robert Bouvier.” He doesn’t even think of it and goes about doing the things he wants to do.”

Purolator helped him get back into competitive sport and is helping him reach his goals. In an interview with Défi sportif, Érik mentioned that Purolator “…is very understanding and respects that I have responsibilities as an athlete. They (the employer) understand that there’s more to life than just work and that sports are important for me to feel fulfilled and to grow. They are giving me the support I need to reach my goals.”

Érik is a positive, upbeat person who is always willing to help and who is also very involved in his community. On several occasions, he has been invited to speak to young people with disabilities to help them push their own limits. As a sledge hockey player, he participated in the 2000 World Championships in Salt Lake City and in the 2004 World Championships in Sweden. He also participated in the 2002 Salt Lake City Paralympics and was a substitute player on the gold-medal team in the 2006 Turin Paralympics.

The Teamsters Union represents 125,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications, Teamsters Canada
Mobile: 514-609-5101
Office: 450-682-5521 x236
Email: slacroix@teamsters.ca

Laval, November 16, 2012 – Dissatisfied with the service provided by the CNTU (CSN), approximately 120 workers employed by Sleeman-Unibroue Brewery have decided to join the Teamsters Union.

The raiding campaign that began in September ended yesterday when the Labour Relations Board approved the certification request filed by Teamsters Union Local 931.

“We’re honoured that these workers chose us,” said Gerry Boutin, the president of Teamsters Local Union 931. “We have the expertise to represent them effectively.”

Collective agreement not honoured

The brewery’s workers are upset with their employer for not respecting certain provisions of the collective agreement, particularly the one regarding seniority.

The president of Local Union 931 cautioned Sleeman-Unibroue’s management, stating “that a collective agreement must be respected by both parties, not just the workers.”

Members will be asked to submit their demands in the weeks ahead in preparation of the bargaining for the next contract in 2013.

The Sleeman-Unibroue plant is located on Montreal’s South Shore, where it produces such beers as Fin du Monde, la Blanche de Chambly and Maudite.

The Teamsters Union represents 125,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications, Teamsters Canada
Mobile: 514-609-5101
Office: 450-682-5521 x236
Email: slacroix@teamsters.ca

There are exceptional people who command respect.

Local 931 steward Sylvain Nobert, who works at Purolator’s sorting centre on Côte-Vertu is such a person.

Sylvain is not only an excellent worker and a steward who looks out for the well-being of his co-workers, he’s also a long-standing, extremely active volunteer.

“When I was 18, I began raising funds for all kinds of causes,” explains Sylvain. “Initially, I did it to socialize and before I knew it, I was hooked.”

In fact, for a while Sylvain spent every free moment raising money for various foundations and charitable causes, notably the Children’s Wish Foundation, the Fondation Charles-Bruneau and Leucan. He viewed his work at Purolator almost as a pass-time, a pass-time that took up 40 hours a week…

“Sylvain is one of the most devoted people I’ve ever met,” says Benoit Baillargeon, the union representative of Teamsters local 931. “Besides the money he raises for sick kids, he single-handedly manages the workers’ social club at Purolator – Côte-Vertu. He has an incredible amount of energy.”

“Helping sick kids is a cause that really speaks to me,” adds Sylvain. “And I tell myself that what goes around comes around. In life, you have to learn to give without expecting anything in return.”

And talk about giving: Sylvain Nobert has raised almost half a million dollars over the last 25 years!

“I’ve organized auctions, oldies nights, telephone campaigns, telethons and more. I’m driven to collect as much money as I can so we can ease the suffering of sick kids.”

Why are we talking about Sylvain Nobert today? Because he’s spent 25 years looking out for others, and that’s something that deserves public recognition.

“I’m less active since I adopted twins a few years ago. I’m a full-time dad, and at 48 with two small kids, that takes a lot of energy,” chuckles Sylvain.

It’s thanks to the Sylvain Noberts of this world that the Teamsters union holds such an important place and plays such an influential role in society.

A union is much more than collective agreements and grievances. It’s the sum total of all the Sylvain Noberts of this world. Without them, the Teamsters would not be as essential to Canadian society.

Kudos Sylvain. Keep up the great work!

The Teamsters Union represents 125,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications, Teamsters Canada
Mobile: 514-609-5101
Office: 450-682-5521 x236
Email: slacroix@teamsters.ca

It appears that Purolator does not tolerate its part-time workers holding two jobs. Indeed, the courier company claimed a “conflict of interest” to force one of its workers to give up his second job.

“Management’s lack of flexibility is outrageous,” explains Gerry Boutin, Local Union 931 president and assistant director of Teamsters Canada’s Parcel Division. “This worker did not hold employment that gave him access to confidential information that could have prejudicially affected his employer. He delivered parcels and took care of loading trucks!”

In fact, all this worker wanted was to be able to meet both ends and satisfy his needs and those of his family. There were no scheduling conflicts between both jobs.

“I simply do not understand how a company would want to prevent workers from improving their standards of living,” adds the union leader, with indignation. “This worker worked 25 hours a week for Purolator and 15 hours for his other employer. What’s the problem?”

The Teamsters Union filed a grievance with an arbitrator and will steadfastly seek justice in this case.

“It’s simply a question of fairness and respect,” concludes the president of Local Union 931. “And we fully intend to convince the employer to see things our way in this matter.”

The Teamsters Union represents 125,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications, Teamsters Canada
Mobile: 514-609-5101
Office: 450-682-5521, ext. 236
Email: slacroix@teamsters.ca

Laval, January 26, 2010 — On January 29th, members of the Teamsters Union will gather in the Borough of Lachine (Montreal) to protest the permanent closing of HBC’s distribution centre, planned for mid-February.This demonstration is taking place nearly one year to the day after this same company closed its call center.

“It makes you wonder if The Bay isn’t simply in the process of closing down all its activities in Quebec,” stated Gerry Boutin, president of Teamsters Local Union 931, which represents the distribution centre workers. “It is a sad day for these people who will have to look for new jobs as of February.”

HBC management announced the bad news to its 150 workers last November 12th, invoking logistical reorganization as a reason for the closure.

The distribution centre supplied The Bay and some Zeller stores in Quebec and the Maritimes. All activities will now be centralized in Toronto for eastern Canada and in Vancouver for western Canada.

“I invite municipal, provincial, and federal elected representatives to join us on January 29th,” said Mr. Boutin. “In my opinion, the workers would appreciate their support during this difficult period.”

What: Rally to support the 150 workers of The Bay’s distribution centre who will lose their jobs in February.

When: Friday, January 29, 2010, from noon to 1:00 p.m.

Where: The Bay Distribution Centre
2105 23rd Avenue, Lachine, QC  H8T 1X3

Spokespersons: Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications for Teamsters Canada, and Teamsters Local Union 931 directors will be onsite to answer journalists’ questions.

The Teamsters Union represents 125,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications, Teamsters Canada
514-609-5101

HBC management announced today that they are closing their Lachine distribution centre. The warehouse employs more than 150 workers, members of Teamsters Local Union 931. The reasons for the closing have not been made public.

The workers and HBC had not yet begun to re-negotiate their work contract, which was due to be renewed in 2010. Up to the announcement, relations between the union and the board had been considered excellent.

"The announcement was a total surprise, says Gerry Boutin, president of Teamsters Local Union 931. On top of that, it’s getting to be the holidays, and the workers feel pretty bad about this, of course."

The Teamsters Union has been in communication with HBC management in Toronto, and meetings are being scheduled over the next few days in an attempt to save the jobs at the distribution centre.
 
"We will be fighting to keep the warehouse open. We’re not going to bargain with HBC management with a view to getting better severance packages."

History appears to be repeating itself, since the telephone operators at the same distribution centre were made redundant under similar circumstances in the fall of 2008.

Most of the workers at Lachine have between 20-25 years of seniority and they earn an average of $17 per hour.

The warehouse supplies the The Bay stores in the Maritime Provinces and Québec.

The Teamsters Union represents 125,000 members in Canada in all trades. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters, with which Teamsters Canada is affiliated, has 1.4 million members in North America.

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Information:
Stéphane Lacroix, Director of Communications, Teamsters Canada
514-609-5101

Last January 7, a member of Local Union 931 was finally reinstated in his position of delivery driver with Jolicoeur, thus marking the end of an interminable legal battle.

It all began in October 2005 when the employee was dismissed without cause. Teamsters (QFL) Local Union 931 refused this injustice and therefore filed an arbitration application.

After a four-day hearing, the arbitrator agreed with Jolicoeur and upheld the dismissal.

Local Union 931 considered this decision absurd, irrational and completely unreasonable. It therefore decided to appeal the decision with the Superior Court. At the end of a difficult process, the court agreed with the Union and concerned member and quashed the arbitrator’s decision.

The rest of the history is memorable. A new arbitrator was then appointed during a new hearing. After a three-day hearing, the arbitrator came to the conclusion that the employee had been honest, upright and very conscientious and ordered that the dismissal be overturned and the employee reinstated.

It is in this particular context that the employee—accompanied by a representative of Teamsters Local Union 931—nevertheless proudly showed up for work on January 27, after a dispute between the parties that had lasted more than 27 months. On the union side, people were all smiles. Needless to say that this wasn’t the case on the employer’s side…

The Union’s officers and business agents wish to congratulate the concerned member for his perseverance and determination.

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